Businesses should take the responsibility of environmental sustainability more seriously

 

By Mary Mueni

 

As the push for more environmental responsibility continues unabated, a growing number of organizations and institutions globally, both in the public and private sectors, have pledged support for climate action. Moreover, the data on the impact of businesses on climate change is now more vivid, making it hard for companies to hide from the reality.

Of course, global organizations have more pressure to share their action plan and evidence of their carbon emission elimination strategies, but local businesses should not be left on the side-lines either.

copy of hallerpark butterflypav 57

Adopting environmental Sustainability strategies in day-to-day operations is becoming more important for all companies, across all industries. Those who have taken the route have pleasantly found that sustainable initiatives are good for business. Right from employees who learn the culture of environmental sustainability through practice at work, up to organisations learning that innovation is part of the process that makes their businesses sustainable adding so much value to their success.

Reassuringly, a number of large companies are developing forward-thinking sustainability policies. For instance, on the global space, Car manufacturers like BMW and Toyota have made strides on energy efficiency and pollution reduction, not to mention Tesla as an outsider really challenging the industry’s overall footprint.

Back home, LafargeHolcim which operates locally as Bamburi Cement, has made strong commitments to sustainability, majorly through its operations, transparency and addressing material issues. Last year, LafargeHolcim made its Net Zero climate pledge, committing to reinvent how the world builds and developed the first climate targets for a 1.5°C future in the cement sector. `

 

Sustainable environmental conservation efforts

Embarking on a more sustainable journey has demonstrated LafargeHolcim’s commitment to the responsibilities that come with being the global leader in building materials and solutions by spearheading the transition towards low-carbon construction, promoting a circular economy as well as shifting to use of alternative fuels and concrete recycling.

For many decades Bamburi Cement has been known for its efforts at quarry rehabilitation and conservation, with the prominent example being Bamburi Haller Park, a former quarry wasteland that is now a rich ecosystem of diverse vegetation and wildlife (comprising rescued animals) which is now a great tourist attraction at the Kenyan Coast and is also source of sharing experiences, expertise and knowledge with others through environmental education programs.

copy of hallerpark butterflypav 51

 

Further, energy intensive industries can also find opportunities in utilizing alternative fuels. For instance, Bamburi now forms partnerships with waste producers - from agricultural, to waste oil and tyres - that substitute fossil fuels in its factories, while also addressing the society’s waste management challenge. The company also invests in modern systems to control emissions from its factories.

In addition, Bamburi Cement offers building solutions like ‘Maskani’ and ‘Houses of Tomorrow’ giving an opportunity to local home builder to not only construct cost-effectively but also achieve very low embodied CO2 footprint buildings.

Overall, no one wins alone. Partnerships, be it with supply chain partners, stakeholders or the community among others is the way to go. This should be in form of regular interactions forging ways that create shared value for people and the planet. Sustainability is about addressing environmental, social and economic issues simultaneously.

It is a worthwhile journey towards a sustainable future, and it makes sense for everyone to take it more seriously.

 

Mary Mueni is the Head of Marketing and Corporate Affairs at Bamburi Cement Ltd.

 

 

For many decades Bamburi Cement has been known for its efforts at quarry rehabilitation and conservation, with the prominent example being Bamburi Haller Park, a former quarry wasteland that is now a rich ecosystem of diverse vegetation and wildlife (comprising rescued animals) which is now a great tourist attraction at the Kenyan Coast and is also source of sharing experiences, expertise and knowledge with others through environmental education programs.